A Response to “Biblical” Criticism of Spiritual Witnesses Part 6

Go back to Part 1.

The Question We are After

TBC continues, off their straw man distortions in the first paragraph might I add,

“But does feeling something is true make it so? Does profound belief assure truthfulness? Can feelings be depended upon to be the witness of the Spirit? When, for example, two opposing religionists both “know” their respective viewpoints are “true” because of personal “revelation” or an inner warm glow, how can it be determined which, if either of them, is correct?”

These rhetorical questions, while being used to set up a deathblow to the LDS perspective, are generally on the right track. Does feeling something is true make it so? No. Does profound belief assure truthfulness? No. Can feelings be depended upon to be the witness of the Spirit? Not always, certainly.

Yet Latter-day Saints would not answer any of these questions in the affirmative, nor would we need to in order to remain on solid theological ground. Any assumption otherwise is just incorrect.

And of course, the last question is what I’ve been trying to get at this whole time. It’s just another way of asking, “How can I come to know spiritual truth?”

TBC’s answer to this question is to rely only to the Bible. This is problematic in many ways, not least of which is that this technique to knowing spiritual truth is fundamentally dependent on how men interpret the Bible.

What makes this problematic? The pastors, teachers, and preachers of mainstream Christianity are all men, flawed men, mortal men, men who deny that God still speaks to us.

What does that mean, really? Whether they be modern pastors, or Church Fathers, or early reformers, none of the men teaching us what the Bible means claim to be, as Peter puts it, “holy men of God [speaking] as they [are] moved by the Holy Ghost” (see 2 Peter 1:16-21).

That’s problematic.

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